Monday, August 4, 2008

Delusional Christians shouldn’t be allowed to vote




Yes, I know … a very controversial statement. A position that certainly sounds contradictory to my strong defense of the Constitution and commitment to personal freedoms. But, before you throw this aside as some radical fascist concept lets examine this dispassionately.

The 15th Amendment to the Constitution says:
“The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.”

Note it doesn’t say anything about people who are so deluded, or who have such a low IQ that their ability to logically exercise their franchise is negated. In fact, certain conditions can and do bar people from voting. Convicted felons can’t vote, and in many states the insane, severely retarded, and mentally incompetent are prohibited from voting. For instance, New Jersey’s Constitution forbids an “idiot or insane person” from voting. Thus, voting is a privilege that can be lost and not an unconditional “right”. So, with that as precedence lets define the “delusional Christian” conditions that I propose should negate a persons voting privilege.

First, let me be clear:
I’m not suggesting that simple belief in God, Jesus as God, the Trinity, prayer, miracles, dead rising, transubstantiation, heaven, hell, etc,. etc., the normal Christian foolishness, should disqualify a person from being able to vote. And I’m not suggesting that failure or refusal to adopt sound scientific theory into ones belief system is delusional. That’s just stubborn foolishness caused by the brain’s religion meme. I’m talking about those people who are so far gone that their beliefs do not allow reality to supplant obvious theological infirmity. For instance:

People who, in spite of overwhelming scientific proofs, irrefutable hard evidence, believe the Earth is less than 10,000 years old because the Bible tells them so … are incapable of rational discernment.

People who believe that God talks to them, that angels visit them, and who have seen witches, devils and demons … are not mentally equipped to participate in the choosing of our nation’s leaders.

People who are convinced that 911, hurricane Katrina, the collapse of a bridge in Minnesota, the death of US soldiers, the spread of AIDs, etc., etc., is God’s divine punishment for society’s acceptance of homosexuality … lack the rational thought necessary to evaluate real world decisions.

People who burn Harry Potter books; believe magic / “witchcraft” is real and inspired by Satan; or who conduct exorcisms on unwilling victims … are, unbeknownst to them, one step away from ingesting or dispensing cyanide laced Kool Aide thus ill-equipped to exercise the voting privilege.



Let’s face it. It’s bad enough that theists are so credulous and gullible that they will believe most anything the Bible, their clergy, or a right wing candidate feeds them. The last thing we need is to allow the most irrational fringe element of their kind to make decisions that can shape our future. If we are destine to screw ourselves by electing the wrong candidates, let the error be on the hands of people who can at least approach clear and reasoned thought unencumbered by schizophrenia induced hyper-religiosity.

6 comments:

Leo said...

"First, let me be clear: I’m not suggesting that simple belief in God, Jesus as God, the Trinity, prayer, miracles, dead rising, transubstantiation, heaven, hell, etc,. etc., the normal Christian foolishness, should disqualify a person from being able to vote. And I’m not suggesting that failure or refusal to adopt sound scientific theory into ones belief system is delusional. That’s just stubborn foolishness caused by the brain’s religion meme. I’m talking about those people who are so far gone that their beliefs do not allow reality to supplant obvious theological infirmity."

Where would the line between "stubborn foolishness" and those who are "far gone" though? I think most people who respond to casual polls and such as believing in God/religious themes do so out of reflex, and if really questioned on it would probably (in my view at least) show rational responses. Since the nutty people are often easy to pick out, then it should be easy to see the line, but I think there are many who straddle that line, on one side or another.

Also, while I certainly agree being a religious fundamentalist would bring one's commitment to reality into question, there are many people who are similarly inclined in other areas. Someone voting or not voting for someone based on their race or age is perhaps just as bad, in the case of voting at least, as something voting for someone because of what the voices in their head tell them.

Have you ever read Heinlein's "Starship Troopers"? In it, only those who have served in the military in some fashion have the right to vote and be officially "citizens". Some call it fascist. I'm not sure.

DromedaryHump said...

Leo, of course you are correct.

It would be difficult to ascertain the really nutty religious people, that I singled out, from the average everyday theist.

Since this is all speculation, I'll suggest two approaches:
1) anyone documented as having blantantly done the things I specified as a disqualifier. That would include: every televangelist, Fred Phelps, Pat Robertson, et al.
2) a simple questionaire at the polls should suffice, seeing as how lying is against christian principles.

ROFLMAO!! Sorry, that 2nd one made me burst out laughing .,.. Hahahahah. :)

Hey, we can dream can't we?

OJ said...

Haha I liked thinking about this idea of disenfranchising people based on their loose grip on reality.

A person who talks to their imaginary friend, "Ken" every night before they go to bed and insist that Ken is in the room even when nobody else can see him or accidentally bump into him can be prevented from voting. But if they just called "Ken" "God" instead, their behavior would be perfectly in line with what is considered normal.

Sometimes I compare religious people to people who love to play Dungeons & Dragons or some other RPG. The difference is that religious people don't know when to stop playing.

DromedaryHump said...

Heheh..."Ken"..perfect analogy!!

Liz said...

A couple more good questions to use as a gauge:

1) Do you believe these are the End Times/Last Days?

2) Do you believe that Jesus's 2nd coming (the rapture) may happen in your lifetime?

If a person answers yes to both of these, it's obvious that they're not going to think rationally about the consequences of political actions taken today that will impact tomorrow. In their eyes it's all in god's hands, and therefore not a result of their own action/inaction.

Another question we should be asking is whether the US gov't should be supporting religon at all (with tax exemptions, etc), given that fanatical religious sheep tend to become fodder for the party with the best wedge-drivers. There should be IRS officials who monitor every church that receives tax exemptions. They sure make time to audit just about everyone else!

DromedaryHump said...

Liz,
Very important points, EXCELLENT!! I couldn't agree more and wish I had remembered them.

I don't know who you are, but welcome, and please come back often.
Hump